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Lumps and Diabetes

Posted on August 9, 2014 | No Comments on Lumps and Diabetes

Lumps associated with Diabetes is clinically referred as Diabetic mastopathy (DMP), which is described by the presence of benign tumour or large, painless, hard breast mass which is somewhat similar to a breast cancer. Common physical characteristics of this lump included that it is hard, irregular, easily movable, distinct, and painless. Diabetic lump can also be lone or manifold, and one-sided or in both breasts. This condition is especially common among women between the ages of 32 and 62 years with long-standing type 1 – insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) although there are cases of diabetic men having the same lump. This condition is especially frequently occurring in the later stages of the disease.

Clinically speaking, this lump or Diabetic mastopathy is a form of lymphocytic mastitis and stromal fibrosis. The exact cause of diabetic mastopathy or diabetic lump is poorly understood and believed to be caused by many factors probably relating to an immunologic reaction. However, since Diabetic mastopathy is associated with type 1 diabetes, it is theorize that the lump is also due to an autoimmune process a particularly the metabolic and functional aberration with neoantigen.

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