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Dark Knuckles and Diabetes

Posted on August 30, 2013 | No Comments on Dark Knuckles and Diabetes

A darkened area of skin in the body is a condition called acanthosis nigricans. Dark skin areas can be found in the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Dark knuckles is one of the discrete tell tale signs of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, syndrome x, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or Pre-diabetes.

Acanthosis nigricans or the darkening of the skin is primarily caused by insulin spill over because of its excessive production. The insulin is spilled into the skin which causes or stimulates color producing cells called melanocytes, which in turn produces the protective skin-darkening pigment melanin that causes the darkening of the skin. As a symptoms for diabetes, people experiencing dark knuckles or darkening of the skin should examine if they are also experiencing the classic red flags for diabetes such as the noticeable increased thirst, the abnormally frequent urination, a sense of tiresome or fatigueness and blurred vision. If these symptoms are equally experience, chances are you are diabetic and should consult a doctor.

The spill over of insulin in the skins is primary due to insulin resistance which is common to obese people and a condition of people suffering from diabetes. For diabetic patients, the darkening of knuckles is very apparent because it is immediately visible to them. The skin darkening in the knuckles is often complemented by the thickening of the skin in the same area which results to pebbled knuckles.

This condition is also called Huntley papules which is characterized by numerous small papules or solid elevations of the skin on the on the knuckles or fingers. Symptoms would include a feeling of stiffness of the joints in the hands and palms which can further develop into diabetic hand syndrome.

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